MEET THE BANGLADESHI HCI RESEARCHERS

Nova Ahmed

Associate Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
North South University

I am Nova, I live in Bangladesh. I work as a faculty in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at at North South University. My area of interest covers any aspect of problem solving covering sensor based hardware systems to human centered computing where we can focus on mainly our local problems here. I am passionate to engage women and children in Computing, STEM and/ or programming. In my free time, I love to spend time with my daughters Anuva and Arisha. Arshad, my husband is around to support me (by default)!

  • Ph.D in Computer Science, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA.

  • MS in Computer Science, Georgia State University, USA.

  • BS in Computer Science, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh

Ishtiaque Ahmed

Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
University of Toronto

Room: 5262, 40 Saint George St, Toronto, ON M5S 2E4
Email: ishtiaque [at] cs [dot] toronto [dot] edu

I am an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. I direct the Third Space research group at the DGP Lab. My research interest is situated at the intersection of computer science and the critical social sciences. My work is often motivated by social justice and sustainability issues, and I put them in the academic contexts of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Information and Communication Technology and Development (ICTD). I operate through a wide range of technical and methodological apparatuses from ethnography to design, and from NLP to tangible user interface. I earned my Ph.D. from Cornell University, where I was advised by Steve Jackson. Before moving to North America, I studied and taught Computer Science at Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET). I developed and still mentor the first HCI community in Bangladesh. I am a Centennial Fellow (’19), a Connaught Awardee (’18), a Fulbright Fellow (’11), and an OpenStreetMap Scholar (’10).